The binding of the UK edition of Star over Bet...This is a modified re-post from last year that seems appropriate again:

I propose that we Christians stop hyperventilating when people say something other than “Merry Christmas.” I’m always sadly amused (if that makes sense) when I see on Facebook, in all-capital letters, stuff like:  PUT CHRIST BACK IN CHRISTMAS!!!!! RESPECT OUR FAITH!!! JESUS IS THE REASON FOR THE SEASON!!!!!

I understand that Christians feel threatened by the equal and opposite hyperventilating from those who seek to wipe out every public nativity scene or reference to Christ.

But can anyone really take Christ out of Christmas? Is Christian faith so fragile that all it takes to knock us on our butts is a greeting like “Happy Holidays”? Should we behave the way the “other side” does, all fearful and agitated and snippy? How Christians answer this in their heads says a lot about what’s in (or absent from) their hearts.

Who cares what other people say? If we’re rooted in Christ, a simple holiday wish shouldn’t be our undoing. If you can’t take a generic greeting graciously, how will you ever come to “bless those who curse you, do good to those who mistreat you”? A secure, assured, at-peace spirit is the mark of Christ in you. So if that isn’t there, Christ isn’t there.

Assuming that we take Jesus seriously and genuinely want his kind of class and character, I propose that we wish our non-Christian friends, neighbors, and strangers a heartfelt Merry Christmas, and smile sincerely when they wish us Happy Holidays. Then say, “Thank you.”

What a concept.

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????????????????????????????Well, I’ve been flying under the radar for longer than the few weeks I predicted when I last wrote in July. But I have a great excuse. My daughter and fiancé moved their wedding date up to Oct. 19 (yes, this year), so she’s now a Mrs. and I’m blessed with a new son-in-law!

Needless to say, this induced a full-time scramble to shape tons of details into something elegant, fun, and unique for a hundred guests. Miraculously, we found a lovely venue that was available with an unbeatably-priced package.

A friend and I made the centerpieces and bouquets and did all the decorating with help from family. The invitations, cake, DJ, photography, videography, flower girls’ dresses, and I-don’t-remember-what-else were offered affordably by other friends. Through everyone’s time and generosity, we pulled off a fairy-tale wedding—complete with a horse and carriage—in just three months.

Our purple and orange Victorian-ish affair sparkled with crystal garland, antique silver, lace and pearls, tall floral centerpieces, and a stunning gown fit for any princess who also happens to love motorcycles. And her dashing prince, whom she met on Christian Mingle, and who loves fishing, happens to ride a Harley.

Me arranging the Harley vaseSo as a tribute, we tucked among the flowers of each glowing centerpiece a tiny Christian fish charm dangling from miniature fishing poles. On an old silver platter from a historic home, we parked a little Matchbox Harley beside a tiny, crystal, horse-drawn carriage. In addition to dancing, a guest photo area with silly wigs and props was a big hit, especially after a few rounds of champagne. Elegant. Fun. Totally unique!

And what is your point, Wilson? Well, I had a few reasons to waste those months all stressed out, but I didn’t. I confess that my initial reaction was panicked delight. Out-of-town family would have to sleep on couches and air mattresses; and I’d have to somehow make room for a growing collection of flowers, ribbon, vases, and such.

Moreover, my husband is a Federal worker and our income had already taken a hit from the sequester furloughs. The government eventually shut down completely until just days before the Big Day.

Really? A wedding? Now?

I write often about exercising our God-given will and freedom to choose. I had a choice. I could easily have turned it into a “this-is-just-a-big-expensive-pain-in-the-butt” thing. But I have only one daughter and one shot at a first wedding, which I knew would be over in a flash. I refused to be robbed, left with nothing but a sour memory.

Christian fish on a fishing poleSo we rolled with it and had fun in organized chaos. I invited God into the planning. And it may sound strange, but I think He had fun, too. (Is He not the ultimate wedding planner?)

There were a few glitches and not everything came off perfectly. But I think—I hope—I did a decent job of not becoming Mom-zilla, imposing all my ideas and getting huffy when some were rejected. Love isn’t easily offended, doesn’t insist on having its way, and doesn’t have to try real hard to find joy.

So I’ve been off the grid, but accomplished a lot since I last wrote. I did read the books I wanted to. I did rest and relax with no agenda on our lake get-away. Good thing, too! My house filled with family we hadn’t seen in years and I got to be part of something amazing. Now I have a dear son-in-law, a grin that won’t quit, and feet that are still numb (no lie!) because it had been so long since I last wore high heels. Who could complain?

*          *          *

For readers local to Northern Virginia, I recommend Virginia Oaks Golf Club as the best-kept secret in the area for weddings. I’ve never experienced such stellar customer service! Virginia Oaks Golf Club

Also, a huge shout-out to Harmon’s Carriages. Thank you for the magic, and on such short notice. carriage[1]

Lastly, to our daughter’s wonderful new parents-in-law, thank you for the rehearsal dinner and killer honeymoon you provided. What a blessing you’ve been and continue to be!

Getup Get God

Getup Get God (Photo credit: prettywar-stl)

The photographer of this graffiti says he saw it in a window and decided to capture it. I saw the photo and decided to use it (freely shareable) to address a widely held misperception among Christians and non-Christians alike.

Many people see God as predominantly unhappy, ready to smite at the slightest provocation. Yet love and grace don’t flow from an abundance of crankiness, but rather, from such profound joy that it spills over even to enemies.

Heaven and angels and all sorts of beings associated with God are consistently portrayed as rejoicing with Him, usually connected immediately with worship. God is supreme in joy, infinite in love, and unmatched in wise, creative goodness. While He’s clearly displeased with some things at some times, that doesn’t mean He’s an ill-tempered Being.

For example, four successive chapters in the book of Job (38-41) are God’s running commentary of delight over the creatures and systems He created on Earth and in its immediate cosmic surroundings. Consequently, Job decides he was a bit rash (though I don’t think entirely unreasonable) in his rant to God. “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me to know.” (Job 42:3) God evidently didn’t think Job was unreasonable, either, for He wasn’t displeased with Job. Sarcastic with a touch of humor, yes, but not displeased.

At any rate, who knows what God has done in the billions of entire galaxies we’re only now discovering? A decade ago, we didn’t even know they exist let alone what marvels they contain. If you and I can delight over beauty or be greatly moved when gazing upon majestic sights even in this fallen world, think what God gets to see every day throughout His wondrous universe—densely rich things He’s not yet introduced to us.

My point is that we can be happy for God that His pervasive joy pours into His creation, which certainly includes mankind. That delight is meant to be contagious; we should “catch” it from Him because our glad-heartedness, cheer, and happiness delights Him and is a primary form of worship.

Old Testament vs. New Testament

So what are we to make of the “mean” God of the Old Testament? I don’t have all the answers, but I do have a few ideas. First, I know that if we overlook the joyful OT God, we’ll never make sense of Jesus or his vision of new life for the world that God has always loved.

I also know that while God Himself doesn’t change, He does change His tactics over the centuries when dealing with mankind. Off the top of my head, one example is the woman caught in adultery, whom Jesus protected from being stoned by the Pharisees.

They, of course, considered Jesus a lawbreaker. But he knew that the New Covenant overwrites the Old Covenant, yet doesn’t alter God’s intent that His Law of love—the Ten Commandments—be both the course and reflection of transformed human spirit and character.

It’s important to realize that lesser laws regarding circumcision, sacrifice, oaths, tithing, stoning, etc., aren’t the Law. The Pharisees had forgotten this, which is precisely what Paul, like Jesus and the original disciples, consistently pointed out.

Common Link

I think a major problem today is the idea that God gave the Law only to show how miserably mankind fails to measure up. God’s Law does do that, but its larger purpose is to restore to us His vision of who we can be. It shows direction and possibility rather than impossibility; and it’s precisely what Jesus embodies and teaches so we can see and pursue that vision.

We might also consider that the twelve original disciples were to Jesus what the twelve original tribes of Israel were to God—an ever-expanding inner circle of collaborators in His plan for the entire world. Although it started with Israel, it was always intended to include everyone—Jews and Gentiles, males and females, young and old, rich and poor, sinners and saints. (Coincidentally, this week I read an interesting article here about the Twelve. Since it fits with my post, you might like it, too.)

It’s wise to remember that Jesus never abolished the Law. What he abolished was Death. When Scripture says that Christ is the end of the Law, it means completion and fulfillment, not cessation or termination. Today’s widespread teaching that Jesus rendered the Law irrelevant is a serious flaw that blinds our faith and paralyzes blessedness.

As the writer of Hebrews said, we fix our eyes on Jesus, who for the joy set before him endured the cross (Heb. 12:2). But by ignoring or minimizing the Law, it is we who render Jesus and all his work irrelevant. In his own words, he boiled the Big Ten down to two simple commands: Love God with all your heart, mind, strength, and soul; and love your neighbor as yourself.

This is the common link I see between the OT and NT; and it doesn’t flow from perpetually miserable cranks. It’s the action of people who can cheerfully obey because they increasingly see what God sees as they prepare for bigger, grander, even more delightful things to come.

Therefore, when we trash-talk what God has made, and worse, ascribe that disdain to Him, we easily conclude that He’s either out to get us or has now taken refuge somewhere far away. It’s tough to love and admire a cosmic Sourpuss, yet that’s what we try to do. Then we say that relationship with God is difficult. That distorted view robs us of the desire to collaborate with Him in furthering His good in what He’s already created and, even now, is happily making new again.

 

lol on a candy heart

I’m amazed at how many Christians think that humor is inappropriate and that Jesus was mostly a man of sorrows. I read an online Relevant Magazine article by James Martin, S.J., entitled “Jesus Was Funnier Than We Think.”  I loved it, and so did many others, but some of the reader comments had me scratching my head.

One said that there’s nothing funny at all about Jesus, that humor and joy aren’t related. Others said that because there’s no Scripture that specifically states, “Jesus had a sense of humor,” it’s a stretch of truth to suppose that he did. Roman oppression was just too serious and Jesus had his hands full taking on the sins of the world. Apparently, he couldn’t even crack a smile.

Don’t get me wrong; I don’t think Jesus did stand-up schtick, but he definitely did use tongue-in-cheek wit and sarcasm regularly. Some of it was aimed at the often-obtuse disciples, but most of it was aimed at the Pharisees.

Be of Good Cheer

I guess it all depends on one’s definition of funny and humorous, and how it relates to joy, laughter, and song. I’ve read of some Christians leaving a church that was too happy and not teaching the serious issues, which I can understand. We want a strong God who can relate to and handle the tough side of life. (more…)

English: Bratislava; New Year 2005; FireWorks

Image via Wikipedia

Sometimes, those three little words, “God loves you” can seem terribly patronizing. Despite much talk about love and joy, we live in a Christian culture (in the U.S., anyway) that seems to be on a mission to minimize—even eliminate—human value and success.

In misguided, over-corrected attempts at humility, it makes for a very one-sided relationship with God where He does everything and our only part is to get out of His way.

For example, if we increase sales at work, or write fantastic term papers, or run a great Sunday school class, many are quick to say that we have nothing to do with it. Instead, it’s “Christ living in you.” Any other response brings accusations of pride and embezzling God’s glory—except when things go wrong. Then it’s all you. Humanity is thus presented as having little value, rightness, or anything really worth celebrating. How tragic and crippling!

One of the themes that Scripture consistently reaffirms is human value, even when we sin. Jesus’ core mission on Earth was to restore to mankind God’s vision of value and worth. It was so central, in fact, that he planned to give his own life to show us this reality. (more…)

 
The binding of the UK edition of Star over Bet...

I’d like to propose that we Christians quit having hissy-fits when people say something other than “Merry Christmas.” I’m always sadly amused (if that makes sense) when I see on Facebook, in obnoxious all-capital letters, stuff like this:  PUT CHRIST BACK IN CHRISTMAS!!!!! RESPECT OUR FAITH!!! JESUS IS THE REASON FOR THE SEASON!!!!!

Good grief, can anyone really take Christ out of Christmas? Is Christian faith so shallow that all it takes to knock us on our butts is a greeting like “Happy Holidays”?

What insecurity! What immaturity! Who cares what other people say? If you’re rooted in Christ, a simple holiday wish isn’t going to be your undoing. If you can’t even take a generic greeting graciously, how on earth will you “bless those who curse you, do good to those who mistreat you”? A secure, quiet, assured spirit is the mark of Christ in you; that’s what love, peace, and joy are. If that isn’t there, Christ isn’t there.

I propose that we wish our non-Christian friends, neighbors, and even perfect strangers Merry Christmas and smile sincerely when they wish us Happy Holidays. In fact, I say we should say, “Thank you.”

What a concept.