Stack of old leather books

Stack of old leather books

Information can be seen as a set of ideas, propositions, or data. For example, this blog contains information.

Knowledge, however, as portrayed in Scripture, is experiential and involves a learning curve. It’s common to have a lot of information, but no knowledge.

Through good and bad experience, knowledge is what you gain when you act on information—whether the information is true or not.

When God told Adam and Eve not to eat the forbidden fruit, all they had at that point was information or “head knowledge.” Same thing when Satan said they wouldn’t die, only that their eyes would be opened. Some of the information was true and some was false. But Adam and Eve’s knowledge of good and evil didn’t come until they actually experienced it.

Mary asked Gabriel how she could become pregnant without “knowing” a man. Obviously, she had information about men, so she meant her lack of sexual experience.

There can also be a body of knowledge gained by other people’s experiences, but until you yourself experience it, it’s still just information. For example, the body of aerodynamic knowledge says that for an object to fly, thrust must overcome drag and lift must overcome weight.

Anyone who wants to become a pilot must gain this knowledge for himself by putting it into practice. So he “believes” by venturing out and taking flying lessons. He finds a competent instructor, studies the aviation “word,” does what both say to do, and discovers knowledge. Otherwise, although it’s knowledge for other pilots, it remains head knowledge for him.

Now, he could just steal a plane and try to figure it all out for himself, but he faces slim odds of coming out safe and sound. And he’d certainly be a danger to others.

Active vs. Static

Belief or faith, as Scripture means it, isn’t just mental agreement. It means to act as if something were true. So, Christian faith is about venturing on Jesus and his kingdom instead of trying to figure it all out on your own. It’s about trusting him enough to act as though his first-hand knowledge, and what he says, is competent and true.

“If anyone chooses to do God’s will, he’ll find out whether my teaching comes from God or not.”  (Jhn. 7:17)

To act appropriately on his information, we need faith, i.e., to believe. Yet faith isn’t the same as knowledge. For example, I can be aware that my car will get me to work each day. That’s a static kind of belief.

But if I never get in, start it up, and put it into gear, I don’t have active faith in my car’s ability, which doesn’t bring me to act in partnership, which doesn’t bring me the knowledge I need for the journey.

Truth and Knowing

It’s interesting that Jesus defines eternal life as knowing God. Many people know about God, but don’t know Him even if they call themselves Christians, Jews, Muslims, whatever.

Jesus offers knowledge of life and the kingdom of heaven. He doesn’t just present awareness of, or information about, how to live, although he does do that. But he also invites experience through practice and knows that mistakes are part of the process.

To gain Jesus’ knowledge, I partner with him, become his student (“like a child”), and act on his information. Salvation is an active journey of learning to live safely in a community of love, racking up experience today that simply carries over into the next life. With Christ, I can know the truth, and the truth sets me free.

It’s not about getting my doctrines or atonement theories correct in order to get to heaven. I realize that’s contrary to popular Christianity, but it’s dangerous because doctrine is information, not knowledge, and doctrine doesn’t save.  Jesus does. And God designed us so that not even He can simply hand someone knowledge, even through flawless information.

Bottom line? Despite today’s Information Age, people still perish for lack of knowledge (Hos. 4:6). And, someday, Jesus will shock even Christians with, “I never knew you.” (Mat. 7:23) So whenever I read about salvation, wisdom, and knowledge, it helps me to think—aha!—experience.

 

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Refresh Symbol - Full CircleWhy did Jesus focus on love for God, self, and neighbor? Why all the practice in living well? Because we’re born to rule and serve creation with God. That’s why salvation isn’t just about forgiveness, but about new life, learning to rule without causing harm. And to prepare, we need divine leadership—the Shepherd, Teacher, and Provider.

That said, let me share three life-changing observations:

The Future (Vision)

I used to see God’s kingdom as strictly future-oriented. But what if this is only partially true? What if the whole truth is that God’s kingdom on Earth is in process now, not yet full, but well underway since Jesus announced its presence among us?

Several years ago, I was reading a retirement-panning article that mentioned setting aside an inheritance. I suddenly wondered why we always associate inheritance with death. Why don’t we ever associate it with living, something you get when you’re born? Don’t we inherit personal traits, living arrangements, and social/financial circumstances at birth?

A light bulb went off—that’s what Jesus meant! The kingdom isn’t set aside; it’s all around, near, at hand. Inheriting its riches is a matter of stepping into its life-style—re-birth. And Jesus brought the keys. (more…)

Juggler

Juggler (Photo credit: anadelmann)

Continuing from last week, transformation from death to life starts with the realization that we’re jumbled, broken souls, but not worthless souls.

You and I can humbly acknowledge our ruined condition without self-contempt, for that’s a seed that lays deep roots and grows into a spirit of contempt for others.

It creates double-mindedness and a divided heart instead of an undivided one. How can you love neighbors consistently or be spontaneously kind to enemies when you’re not even prepared to love yourself?

The person you are inside is the person you are when your guard is down—like after you’ve had too much wine. Everyone knows the happy drunk or the belligerent drunk, and it’s common to hear, “That was the alcohol talking last night.” But it was really the true person sneaking out when alcohol put the guard to sleep.

A member of my family was married years ago to a charming guy who became verbally and physically abusive when he drank. When he was sober, he was always deeply, genuinely, terribly sorry. He tearfully pleaded for (and received) forgiveness. But he never changed.

The fact is regret alone has no transformative power. Forgiveness alone won’t move you into the promised land of wellness. While these are necessary components of Christian repentance, the driving force behind transformation is a clear vision of who you can become, the willing choice to change, a sensible, knowledgeable way to do it, and then following it. God supplies everything but the willingness and the following. (more…)

Cropped screenshot of Charlton Heston from the...
Cropped screenshot of Charlton Heston from the trailer for the film The Ten Commandments. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A few weeks ago, I mentioned that knowing God is the definition of eternal life and briefly explored some ways to practice His presence. This week, we look at knowing ourselves—who we are and who we can become. Before anyone can change for the better, they need to see where they are and know where they want to go.

First, See the Big Picture (Vision, Image)

The epic Exodus found in the Old Testament is an eye-opening, big picture of salvation. It isn’t simply “going to heaven” when you die. Deliverance isn’t an airlift where you’re in one place/condition then suddenly transported to another. God didn’t lift the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt into the Promised Land.

Rather, deliverance is passage. Salvation is spiritual exodus from ruin to new life—transformation and restoration while you live. The person you are when you die is the person who steps into the afterlife. Living eternally with God is simply the extension of living your current life with Him, for the present is included in, and part of, eternal life.

Thankfully, God wasn’t waiting on the other side of the Red Sea for the Hebrew slaves to figure it out and arrive on their own. Likewise today, He isn’t waiting on the other side of the pearly gates. God was with the slaves through it all. Although He initiated and master-minded their passage, He didn’t do everything for them. In partnership, He instructed and held them accountable to conquer many things, always with the promise that He was with them.

God still initiates transformation, but doesn’t do everything for you. So practice is to modern Christians what the desert was to the Israelites. It’s about preparation, refinement, mistakes, and correction. By grace, God shows the way of deliverance and offers His presence and support throughout. It’s the great theme of Scripture. (more…)

Footprints
Footprints (Photo credit: Peter Nijenhuis)

Practicing the presence of God is the preliminary step to all other Christian practices. It isn’t something you do once or twice or just on Sunday. It’s a life-style that facilitates loving God with all your heart, mind, strength, and soul—not because God needs His ego fed, but because it sets you up for filling with positive things.

Obviously, if you don’t see the Spirit of God as having qualities you admire and want for yourself, you won’t have much incentive to seek them. (I don’t mean His omni-qualities that no human being will ever gain. I mean love, competence, intelligence, strength, compassion, etc.)

Assuming the desire, it’s possible to develop inner Christ-like qualities (spirit) that naturally result in Christ-like behavior—“Christ formed within you” (Gal. 4:19). But trying to be Christ-like by merely conforming to right behavior short-circuits the spiritual process and you’ll eventually burn out. Jesus compares it to a house built on sand that comes crashing down (Mat. 7:26-27).

Burdens

Two different philosophies set you up for the crash:

(1.) Behavior and obedience are top priority. Don’t break the rules. If you do, the right rituals and prayers will atone for it, so the sort of person you are is of little consequence.

This is the “righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees” that Jesus says people must get past (surpass). They cleaned the outside of the cup, but the inside remained full of negative qualities (Mat. 23:25-26). Their idea of redemption was that as long as people tithed correctly, got circumcised, or avoided murder, they could be as full of greed or anger, for example, as the next guy.

 (2.) Behavior and obedience don’t matter. You’ll always break the rules. So, having the right beliefs, particularly in forgiveness or gratitude, is top priority. The sort of person you are is of little consequence as long as God finds the correct doctrines in your mind.

This is today’s idea of “right with God” among most Christians. This version of redemption is that people can be as full of anger or greed, for example, as the next guy as long as they believe they’re just sinners “saved” by grace. Instead of avoiding sin, it’s about avoiding guilt and punishment.

In either case, people learn to act like Christ rather than be like Christ; and acting is a heavy burden to maintain. By contrast, the way of salvation is much lighter—a gift from God to develop inner goodness that’ll shine on the outside with much less effort. C.S. Lewis noted, “Surely what a man does when he is taken off his guard is the best evidence for what sort of man he is.” (more…)

Crown clip artMaybe we should start with what God doesn’t require from you: flawlessness. The biblical word “perfect” (Greek, teleios) means complete, whole, mature, brought to a finished end or goal.

When Jesus said to “be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Mat. 5:48), he didn’t mean flawless, absolutely sinless, and error-free. The sooner you divorce this mind-set and all that goes with it, the sooner you escape Babylon’s cup of toxic, spiritual adulteries.

God simply wants you to be like Him. Or, more accurately, more like Him than you already are. Even as a sinner, you’re created in His image, having more in common with Him than anything else in creation. The goal is to restore that to full completion.

So the first step to becoming more like God is to love, admire, and want His qualities. You can’t pursue what you don’t want, or what you don’t see as possible and worth pursuing. Therefore, “Love God with all your heart, mind, strength, and soul” isn’t God’s demand to satisfy His ego or meet a divine need. It’s His visionary spark to jump-start meeting your needs.

God wants you mentally, emotionally, and spiritually sound, whole, complete, and mature. What does that mean? It means you can love yourself and others. Love your neighbors, including enemies, as yourself. That’s what a clean spirit, “cured” and healthy, looks like. (more…)

A Gorilla lounging around.

A Gorilla lounging around. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today’s post was prompted by an article in Relevant Magazine, “I Used to Be On Fire for God” and the associated reader comments. I enjoyed the article, left my own comment, and elaborate on it here.

I like Relevant’s site (self-described as aimed at the twenty-something crowd) because it’s like a finger on the pulse of the Body of believers.

As a Baby Boomer with roots in the 1970s “Jesus Freak” movement, I like seeing positive changes that younger Christians bring to the Church. Yet some things are no different today than back then.

It’s been my experience in 40+ years as a Christian that a huge segment of the Body still sees Christ’s message of new life entirely as, “Jesus is Lord!” or, “Your sins are forgiven!” or, “God loves you!” These statements are all true, of course.

But for multitudes, new life in God’s kingdom has been reduced to little more than slogans and hype. It’s sometimes called bumper-sticker Christianity. And many Christians define passion, revival, and the Great Commission as saying these as loudly and as often as possible, which is what the article touched on. (more…)